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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
, international donors have pledged more than 1 billion euros for those displaced by the civil war in the country. united nations secretary general said the fund raising goal had been exceeded. >> representatives from nearly 60 countries met in kuwait to examine how to help with the millions of people who have fled the fighting within syria and the 700,000 who are refugees in neighboring countries. the french military advance against islamist fighters in northern mali continues to make rapid progress. emma the troops have taken control of the airport over the weekend. virtually unopposed, the -- two other cities of the weekend. the french are now negotiating with tuareg rebels, who say they have control. >> onto economic news, and financial markets have been on the rise these past few weeks as hopes have grown that the worst of the year of crisis has passed. today in spain, there's a reminder that things are very bad still for millions of people. revenue figures show spain sank even deeper into recession in the final quarter of last year with the economy contracting faster than ever. more than on
stronger than expected. it rose in january, current conditions 108 versus the expectations of 107. euro/dollar is about 1% higher on the back of that news. the ifo institute, current conditions, 108. headline index, 104.2 versus 103. ross, what do you make of it? >> well, you can see what's going on with the euro there, 134. let's get more from finland. good to see you, alex. thanks indeed for joining us. the defense here that we're no longer in crisis fighting mode, the question as we look at data in germany, the question is whether we've made a fundamental turn, a fundamental change and whether things are temporary. >> i certainly hope we've made a fundamental turn. if this crisis is 100 steps, i'd say we are about 60 steps down the road. now, really, we have the fundamental institutional things in place. so that has calmed down the markets. what we now need is political stability. i think the italian election is one thing and the second thing we need in europe more than anything else is -- >> yeah. we thought stabilizing the crisis in terms of the bond spreads playing out was hard. g
sure the euro got through this problem. and i was designated as a questioner to ask him about the banking union. and at that point he was very optimistic. he thought the banking union could be worked on and in place in the first quarter of this year. well, now they've moved it to the first quarter, hopefully, of 2014, and you still have arguments over how it's going to be done. so you need to put a timeline on this, and then you've got to adhere to it. but to get the banking system back with similar regulations throughout the eurozone is absolutely necessary. it is key to the recovery of europe. second of all is a plan that he talked about on july 26th in london last year which is the outright monetary transactions, omt, where it's the ecb would buy bonds from the countries in trouble along with the european stability mechanism under certain conditions. in other words, certain conditionality. now, the ecb isn't going to put up that conditionality. they've got enough on there as a central bank and now as a supervisor for the banks. and so it'll probably be the international mon
. >> good to see you today. this survey up to multi month high necessary all four of the largest euro area countries, just in the rate of decline, easing in france, easing in spain, situation stabilizing in germany. what does that mean for investors? >> we get two flashes, we get the flash and the final. so not only are we getting an indication of the progression month to month, but we're getting this sort of update. so the market feels they have momentum. since july, really, it's the commitment from mario draghi to do whatever it takes to save the eurozone. the uncertainty that dominated the fist part of 2012 was all about what happens if the currency situation collapses. i think this positive momentum that we've begun to see in all the major indices, which is when i will they're showing below 50, this shows confidence is returning in both the manufacturing and services sector across the larger economy. it's telling us that the directional bias is the more positive one. people are committing further out in terms of their own anticipation expectations. so the detail, if you dig down into i
. cheryl: one of the things we look on a daily basis during the market hours is what the euro is doing versus the dollar. always surprised me that the euro never went below like a $1.22 or so against the dollar. now you have the pound. i know you don't like the pound. so i'm curious kind of how you're playing that over in europe right now. >> it's been very interesting. just a year ago, everybody thought that the euro was going dramatically lower, sub 120, 115. i think the major aspect to that is what was it in relation to? we were talking about it in relation to the dollar, and the fed kept on printing money. and the ecb in contrast really has not printed money. they are not injecting new funds into this, whereas what i think is going on with sterling, you know, they are going to probably be the brink of triple dip recession come this friday in the fourth quarter gdp figures. their economy is not doing very well. they will probably have to stimulate that economy going forward. and probably talk about further asset purchases out of them over the next couple of months. cheryl: i have pl
will consider esm bonds an important investment asset. along with other euro denominated bonds issued by major european nations. >> the government plans to use the foreign currency bonds to continue to buying esm bonds. government officials see the moreover as a way to stabilize the european economy and discourage traders from receiving the safety of the yen in case debt problems worsen. >>> unemployment in the eurozone renewed record highs for four straight months in november. the jobless rate was especially high in the countries that continue to implement austerity measures. the eu statistics office announced unemployment in the zone stood at 11.8%. up 0.1 percentage points since october and highest since the euro was introduced in 1999. within the zone, spain showed the highest rate. it rose from 26.6% in spain. many young people out of work under half of those under 25 were jobless in the month. up 0.7 points since october. in portugal, unemployment stood at 16.3%. 14.6% in ireland. for greece, latest data up only to september. the jobless rate in that month, 26%. 0.7 percentage points hig
to suit the euro but also to suit all of us as well. make the argument for a flexible, competitive euro, take the british people with you. >> south africa is looking at newark power for its future nuclear ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear energy needs. >> the corzine were the original inhabitants of southern africa. for at least 2000 years, the hunted, herded, and gathered on the land and the sea. skeletons in the sand and evidence of what and where they ate. >> maybe they ate the food out of the jars. >> the land was seized by colonialists. under apartheid, their identity was further fracturing the proposal to build a nuclear power station here is unacceptable. >> they take our land. they are ready to take our identity away from us. everything we have got, they take away from us. now what is left for us is only -- >> these artifacts were all collected here. she and her husband, a traditional healer, are trying to preserve a culture they say is not respected. they do not have former first reform of first nation indigenous that as yet. -- they do not have formal first
the fact that the euro crisis has calmed to the point that investment is possible again in troubled countries. >> in a global economy the face of companies like schuler is tied to markets throughout the world. for now the mechanical engineers say that they can count on strong demands, especially from china. >> if i don't think we have reason to be pessimistic. businesses always connected to psychology. i think that lots of german companies are in a very good position and the demand for many products, in the machine and equipment area, is extremely high and it will remain so. >> german engineering firms head into the new year with confidence a sign the job market will remain stable in the months ahead. >> if you are looking ahead with optimism to the new year you are not alone. pope benedict predicts peace will prevail in 2013. >> the pontiff made his upbeat forecast to mark the catholic church's world day of peace. he was convinced of humanity's capacity to live without conflict despite the inequality and terrorism afflicting many parts of the world. >> yeah. there is one such confl
major challenges confronting us today. first, the problems in the euro zone are driving fundamental change in europe. second, there is a crisis of european competitiveness as other nations across the world sort ahead. and third, there is a gap between the eu and its citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years. and which represents a lack of democratic accountability in consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. if we don't address these challenges, the danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift towards the exit. i do not want that to happen. i want the european union to be a success. and i want a relationship between britain and the european union that keeps us in it. that is why i am here today. to acknowledge the nature of the challenges we face, and to set out how i believe the european union should respond to them. and to explain what i want to achieve for britain and its place within the european union. so let me start with the nature of the challenges we face. first, the euro zone. the future shape of europe is being forge
development, and them you've got drawing a line in the sand doing whatever it takes to defend the euro, and to me, that was a game changer. not too many game change everies, but when he said that over the summer, hey, think about putting money to work in italian bonds. they have attractive yields particularly relative to treasuries, and poland, it's got an attractive yield, a strong currency out there. not as attractive as italy right now, but there's money allocated to it. david: jack, when you talk about italy, poland, and mexican bonds, i used to cover mexico in the 80s, and 90s, and i remember defaults there. to me, it sounds more like junk bonds than fixed income? >> well, you know, i make the comment that, you know, they are not your father's emerging markets. there's been a huge development over the last ten years or so in the the developing world right now, and mexico is a classic example of that. david: i have to challenge you, jack. >> sure. david: mexico had terrible crisis with the drug war, and that eventually effects investments in mexico of the there's a lot of developme
. the currency markets, open for trading for a lot longer today than stocks. the euro is still below 133, the recent high. it's interesting to see that the risk-on currencies are a bit to the upside. >> watch gold, too. i think gold, 12th year of good performance. >> yes. >> i would emphasize gold should be part of people's portfolios. >> while i don't disagree with you, because i've been wrong on gold two years in a row, silver better performer last year than gold. >> numbers are numbers. i find that the gld is just a very, you know, good way, i hope it goes down, the rest of your portfolio goes up. but remember, in the last 12 years we've had deflation, inflation, good control, bad control, but gold is steady because gold is in short supply in the world. >> i thought we were being positive. i'm optimistic for the next year or so. ten years out, different story. oil prices, right? while they've gone up in the last couple weeks, gas prices are down. >> gasoline. >> gasoline. and nat gas remains fairly low. >> nat gas at four-month lows right now. >> let's not underestimate the extra mone
central bank to drop interest rates which would, i think, push the euro lower and help on exports. i think it always hangs out there, you know, that's the biggest argument why greece should leave the euro. i do not see that you're going to have the two-tiered or three-tiered system. .. because if you don't show there's growth potential -- i should say portugal increased its experts substantially, -- exports substantially. you have to be competitive. you have to have deregulation. those are even more important than a devaluation, because a devaluation only last so long, whereas if you make the structural changes -- this is going to be a challenge for -- you had 14 of these stimulus programs since the late 1990s in japan, and none of them have really done the job. so you have to bundle this up in a packet, and put them through. so that's the best way i can answer you. i think that where europeans have fallen down -- goes back to the questions we already had -- they didn't put the emphasis on being competitive. they didn't put the emphasis on driving the fiscal side and the monetary said and
the trading day higher led by consumer discretionary and energy. the euro hitting a 11-month high versus the dollar after the ecb said banks will pay back loans faster than expected. euro rising to $1.34 in intraday trading against the greenback. >>> new home sales as we mentioned before falling last month dropping to an annual rate of 3509,000. that is last month's drop did not derail the previous gains. housing sales posted the best year since 2009, jumping 20% from a year ago, sandy. >> we have our market panel. jeff saut, chief investment strategist at raymond james. david steinberg, dls capital managing partner. let's first start with mark. the take on the rally here. it is good news, bad news. this market seems to want to continue to plow higher. >> absolutely. we have some tax clarity. we have some debt ceiling clarity. you give the market clarity, and improving economic numbers and decent earnings season hard for us not to rally higher. you know, we're closing over 1500. we closed over 1500 under monday. i think that is really bullish for the next couple of weeks at least through
to the opening bell. we're watching also outside of equities a big move in the euro u.s. dollar up 1%, which is a huge move for the currency markets. we're also watching oil. oil also up by about a percent or so on the back of the very good china export data that came in overnight. >> nigerian barges out there with huge cargos as i'm trying to rationalize how is it that o oil -- we're paying so much for gasoline. >> mineral exploration company based in vancouver. owner and operator of fitness clubs in the northeast. up pretty much across the board. just jumping out at me, intel, hewlett-packard and dell still stringing together pretty nice gains. hugh let hewlett-packard up. very fascinating report out yesterday, we had tony on last night on fast talking about the sum of the parts analysis. if hp breaks up or just realized to its full potential under meg whitman, $29 a share is what he's pegging some of the parts analysis at. >> when you pronounce something dead, whether sprint versus verizon and at&t versus clearwire, what we discover is there's a resilience even to companies that we basica
here. foreign exchange quickly. look at the euro/yen, continues to forge higher and higher, you see on this chart, we are just a couple months away from three-year highs. if you look at the dollar again, one of the bright spots on the green back, which by the way, made new lows on the year and continues to hover at those levels, we are at the best level against the yep in 2 1/2 years, june of 2010. we want to monitor. david faber, viacom news? >> let's start with viacom. like to focus on these media companies, having followed them for so many years. doing this quarter perhaps, a bit more hope that aid see advertising revenues knocked down quite as much but investors don't seem to be scared off on the quarter, they are talking more positively about the outlook in terms of what we can expect for the next quarter and for sequential improvement in those numbers. let's look inside the numbers we can, there is advertising, affiliate fees numbers for viacom. capital return such an important theme throughout the media business these days. no surprise and no shock there that they bought back
whose printing press is faster. breached 120 on the euro, a big deal. breached 90 on the dollar/yen so the japanese are definitely devaluing their currency, but to be fair, it was just last year that the dollar reached a record low on the end, so if you take a wide enough view, you know, the japanese aren't mistaken, say, and they are just trying to price it more accurately. the problem is once this machine gets going of printing and weakening, how does it ever stop? >> yeah. how much of this rally lately that we've been talking about here has been fundamental and how much is just the greasing by the fed, do you think? >> well, look, i think the liquidity backdrop is the ultimate context where all the rest is going on. we've had bad enough economic scares with this much or almost this much central bank liquidity where the market had no trouble not going up, so i don't think it can be explained by one thing or another. talking about five-year highs, since april 2nd of next year up less than 5%, not necessarily as if we've torn our way to some massive runaway gains. i feel like we're jus
trades could have been, and they were. whether it's euro/yen, dollar/yen. if you want to know why our stock market is doing well, look at this chart. a chart of one year of the nikkei and obviously something magical happened towards the end of last year. look how the stock market took off and connect the dots with the transcripts, ben bernanke's advice given a decade plus going to the japanese was definitely put in place, the liquidity programs, the quantitative easing, the monetizing and look what happened to their stock market, and if you also look at what happened to the jgb, briefly, they shot up in yield. it's moderated a bit. kyle bass is on today with david faber and everybody loves kyle bass. >> right. >> he talked about the first black swan with all the central banking activity probably turns out to be japan. we don't know when. i would fully agree and i think these two charts give you some clues that there is a possibility. >> andres, what do you think? is japan back? >> well, i think to a certain extent the unintended consequences is what we're actually going to see in the
euro skeptics warn seven are in recession. it's possible that germany falls into a recession as well. so they aren't out of the woods yet. don't get complacent about europe. did japan just start a currency war? announcing a full on assault on inflation. that's likely to weaken their currency and a lot. making it more difficult for the u.s. and europe to increase their exports. where does it end? what kind of unintended consequences could it bring? the third possible derailment, china. not the pace of their growth which has recovered. china worries more about political risk because the country has new leadership for the first time in ten years. and if the country is going to keep growing, they must do some very controversial reforms. that's going to lead to some kind of internal distress as investors try to hold on to power. and the final wild card, iran and its nuclear ambitions. there it's hard for the markets to measure what could happen. >> okay, michelle. thank you. a group of bipartisan senators meanwhile have agreed on a proposal to overhaul immigration laws. let's get to eamon
talking about for weeks and it's been a home run, the euro/yen. we're not at the best levels of the day, but it is a friday. at least on trading floors, fridays have something in common. usually a little evening up with the markets. maybe look for some of these currency trends to run out of gas at least on a day trading basis. >> thank you, rick. don't forget the lift on china, gdp. sharon? >> the gainer here, leading the gains in the commodity sector based on that data out of china on growth industrial production, also keep your eye on what is happening in terms of the precious metals. we're looking at gold prices that have dipped a little bit here. not able to meet that resistance at the moving average. but silver continues to take off here. silver is actually the gainer for the week. the biggest gainer in the commodities complex for the week. we're looking at silver, actually silver coins running out of the u.s. there's so much investor demand for them. that's the story a lot of traders are talking about this morning. we're also keeping an eye on the wti oil price after it hit a four
. written -- britain. >> i will tell you why germany is doing so much better, it is the euro. germany is an exporting country, and they export to their neighbors. it prevents their neighbors from devaluing their currency. >> where is the context for your numbers? i am sure you are not advocating borrowing 40 cents on the dollar. [indiscernible] >> i said they are in a crisis because of decades of certain policies. >> that have put together an unsustainable federation. >> put him back on my washington hat as we move along, one of the most successful theories on our blog has been this is where your money went. people in europe and the united states stand up with signs saying what kind of government money they get, whether it's health care, welfare. the one that went viral was the author of the harry potter books proudly standing with the dole in front of her. she and her family were supported by government benefits before she became a billionaire. should we not give everyone a chance? we are going to have more people who can either fall through the cracks or come back and be productive
, things have slowed down so much there's been so much unemployment, 11.6% in the euro zone than it's having the opposite effect. we have to find a more dalan ba approach to how we go forward. europe has a disproportionate influence of this conversation. there is a conversation particularly vis-a-vis the united states as to how much is too much and how much austerity, how much in terms of cutting back is actually enough, christine? >> really nice to see you. when you run into indiana jones, he can have his hat back. nice to see you. >> how many bars are there over the world that have pictures of you in them? >> no, i turned 28 at a davos -- last year -- and it was one of the best birthdays ever. first time i ever ran into kings and bankers and princesses. it's really an interesting .01% of the global leaders. >> with the official public swearing inform the president all done, you know that, small matter over, the really big news of the day -- what was she wearing? look at that lovely red dress. this is not just a big story, it is epic. we'll have it coming up. but if you're looking
that europe is so lousy and euro is still at $1.32. [ woman ] if you have the audacity to believe your financial advisor should focus on your long-term goals, not their short-term agenda. [ male announcer ] join the nearly 7 million investors who think like you do. face time and think time make a difference. at edward jones, it's how we make sense of investing. maybe you want to incorporate a business. orrotect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal plan attorney is available in most states with every personalized document to answer questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. >> at 24 minutes past the hour, hello there, i have your fox news minute. israel's president perez is warning of a new palestinian uprising if israel doesn't do more to reach a peace accord. it is the second time in less than two weeks he has criticized prime minister benjamin netanyahu before the january 22nd elections. a commuter bus and mini school bus collided in new jersey this morning. at least 7 people on the commute
. these currencies enjoying an uptick including the euro back to almost 1.35. we'll be right back. >> it is 20 one minutes past the hour. i'm heather nauert with your fox news minute. a federal judge approved bp's guilty plea deal reached with the justice department following the 2010 oil spill in the gulf of mexico. bp pleaded guilty in november to manslaughter charges and other charges and will pay a record $4 billion in criminal penalties for the company's role in that spill. 11 workers died when the macondo well blew out, causing the worst offshore spill in u.s. history. >>> transportation secretary ray lahood is announcing he will leave the obama administration. lahood who spent the past four years pushing for greater safety on the highways and in the air, will stay on until his replacement is chosen and confirmed. >>> high pollution levels and thick smog is surrounding beijing today. authorities are warning children and older adults to stay indoors. the toxic air contains particles thick enough to penetrate lungs. it is forcing flight cancellations. relieve could come tomorrow, snow and rain
,000 euros or about $5,000 in restitution. >>gretchen: new york top cop ray kelly wants to put fake pill bottles in pharmacies with real supplies to track robbers. >>eric: our fears over the flu, widespread flu outbreak getting out of hand? at least one new york city youth sports group is discouraging kids from giving high fives and fist bumps. the manhattan soccer club sent parents an e-mail warning them the safest thing to do instead is to touch elbows. elbow-five bump. i agree with that. i like that idea, elbow bump. >>gretchen: in big groups over the weekend they were telling people don't shake hands. >>steve: it will be interesting to see if the catholic church suspends signs of peace during the cold or flu season. check out this video from glendale, arizona. a family making the most of the chilly weather, turning their frozen pool into a hockey rink. it wasn't thick enough to stand on but they were able to pass the puck. maria molina joins us now. maria, it is not frozen everywhere like it is there in arizona, but it is chilly in the middle. >>maria: very cold out west. we have tem
of the euro is not likely anymore, and that's clearly the case. i think draghi has done a terrific job. and number three getting through the leadership transition in china and further stimulation in china. all of those three things are more positive than they have been at any point in the last several years. >> in no doubt about it. in terms of europe. you have the election in italy, bonds due, interest on the bonds due in spain. do these represent hiccups do you think? >> i think they're just challenges or marks in the journey. look at what the progress has been in europe. the progress with the fiscal constraint in portugal, in ireland, in spain. the role monti has played in italy and the leadership he's given that country. the steadfastness of merkel in germany. the fiscal restraint in the uk. all of these are saying we get it collectively. we need to show restraint, but we need to restructure at a pace our societies can absorb so we're going to have a continued series of steps. there's no big bang answer. >> speaking of the u.s. for a moment, a number of banks are getting out of fix
trying to shift mortgage and credit card debt. look at the problems in the euro zone, in our own european neighborhood. i think we're doing the right things. i don't think anyone should start making foolish decisions -- statistical predictions about what's going to happen to something as unpredictable as the global economy. but we're doing the right reforms and implementing the right changes to ensure that healing process continues. >> we don't now make her own forecast. we've given it to the office for budget responsibly. they are forecasting growth this year, as our almost every other economic forecaster. that's what the forecasters say. it begs the question, what should the government be doing. it's vital that we provide a low interest rates the economy needs and does what our fiscal strategy is so important. but i've also point to what are the things that business organizations, the wealth creators have asked for? they want backing -- they want enterprise zones around the country. we've introduced it. they want a real export driver. we get behind exports. on every issue wealth careers
debate pose big risks to the worldwide economy. the ongoing recession in the euro zone also a factor. >>> and winter weather prompts a state of emergency. salt trucks ran all night long to prevent sleet and freezing rain from the roadways and almost a quarter inch of ice formed on power lines and heavy rain is now causing flooding. >>> facebook's new search tool is surrounded by hype, but others think it might be a dude. it's called graph search and it's a way to search through your facebook network for answers. information google cannot access. you could look for restaurants your friends like, kind of like yelp or look for job connections like on linked-in or you can use it to find singles in your area. steven levy is the senior writer for "wired" magazine. steven, welcome. >> thank you. >> okay, you went to the facebook campus, experimenting with graph search. you interviewed mark zuckerberg. so, is this really as revolutionary as we're led to believe? >> well, it's very big for facebook. facebook has a couple things that people do all the time. they share photos and other things w
for the program rather than build the module. the price tag on the initial price tag is around 150 million euros, or $200 million. >> this is the start of an extended cooperation and of course, we can imagine that in the further path, we can expand on that. >> reporter: this is proof that the exploration of deep space is becoming an international endeavor. there is still much uncertainty, though, as to where that might take us. to an asteroid, the dark side of the moon, or mars. but with this vehicle, nasa says we will be able to get there. >> you don't design a car to just go to the grocery store. you design a car that can go to the grocery store, go to the shopping mall, maybe drive across the country, you know, do other things. >> i want my car to go to mars. >> to mars. >> mm-hmm. >> manned mission to mars, that would be really cool. >> my car doesn't have a bumper right now by the way. oh, lookit! rocket muller. i'm going to get you a train. >> where am i, on another planet there? >> the other studio. >> i'm a rocket man. >> that's our other studio. that's space studio. that's a good look f
to the bar afterwards. it is friday night. it's an enough euro. there's a lot to celebrate the missa please join us. does you on,.com, please. the runoffs come over and continue the conversation the place remains to be happening. they take one more for you have it. >> is a hammer computer situation. we actually support the border protection. i actually have a question for mayor stanton. he mentioned some of the divisive policies at the state and county level. how have you or how are you combating that in order to bring business back to the city and the state? >> thank you for the question. high-profile position as mayor of phoenix, largest city in the state. trying to send a message to the three. divisiveness. we tried decisiveness. it's not good for the business cycle in our community. so mayor rothschild and i have traveled twice already on trade missions to mexico. they're going to go back over and over again. i want to send a message that relationship is critically important to our community, that were focusing on the right things. economic development, jobs, education. the right public
of the ice age, what will the intercontinental exchange deal for euro nyse be for trading? lori: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's term set to expire next year. speculation is mounting who could take over. lou dobbs narrows the field for us next. ♪ . [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him twongs -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll wk his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and me from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his la, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. lori: here's your fox business brief. coca-cola taking on obesity. the beverage maker is airing two minute ads showing provided drinks with fewer calories over the years and the obesity epidemic is not a result of its drinks but because people are consuming too many calories of any and all kinds. >>> horizons family solution to making it
. these are all measured in dollars. when there is a sense of crisis in the currency, whether they are euros or dollars, large investors are looking for their value. where is their value out there? where can they put their currencies? if you look back to 2008 -- that was when we saw the first major spike in the price of global food. we saw a sense that we cannot want to put money in equities. real estate was tanking. the debt market was tanking. where do we put all of this cash we are sitting on? in commodities. a bunch of academic studies came out same commodities were a legitimate form of asset allocation. instead of just putting our money in stocks and bonds and mutual funds, now you will see a lot of money managers allocating assets into commodities. this is only possible through newfangled derivatives through wall street, electronically traded funds. that is the way food becomes an asset in your portfolio. the problem is that those asset allocations and those newfangled derivatives have an inflationary effect on the price of food globally. host: here is the first call for you from georg
in not euro speeches from the last six years, starting with ronald reagan's a dress from 1981. though clinton in 1993. white eisenhower in 1957. harry truman, 1940 nine. 1960 nine, richard nixon, then president kennedy in 1961. george w. bush in 19 99. lyndon johnson that from 1965. jimmy carter from 1977. we will wrap up with george w. bush from 2001. starting tonight at 8:00 pm on c-span. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear -- , --[no audio]>> the official swearing ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. our coverage includes your phone calls and a look back at the 2009 presidential inaugural address. the public and inaugural ceremony will be swearing in at noon eastern at the us capitol and other festivities, including the capitol luncheon and parade. live coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. join the conversation by phone, facebook, and on twitter. >> you can see the crews finishing up work between the white house and the capitol getting ready for the inauguration. you can see in front of the white house off of the inaugural parade on monday. some of the finishing t
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)